Sunday, November 6, 2011

Library of the Early Mind

The closest I have come to watching Library of the Early Mind was during the American Library Association's Annual Conference in New Orleans. Due to a scheduling conflict, I missed the screening. I'm almost over it.

After months of checking The Library of the Early Mind's blog for screening information and updates, the post I most anticipated appeared yesterday.

We are now accepting reservations for DVDs of Library of the Early Mind, which will be available for purchase as of December 1, 2011. As we begin to fulfill DVD orders, we will give priority to those who have reserved in advance and paid in full.

We’ve priced the DVD of Library of the Early Mind at one amount of US$30 for both consumers and institutions, recognizing that libraries, schools, and universities are finding it harder to allocate funds for more typical educational pricing of $150 to $200, which would represent a sum covering the use of a DVD for patron loans or multiple showings. Our general price of US$30 is in the range of “consumer” pricing for independent films.

We hope the pricing will allow you to enjoy and share the film. We encourage consumers looking to view the film individually to consider our online digital rental, priced at US$4.99 (available later in November). We also encourage educators to consider using the digital rental to have students view the film outside classroom time. It helps reflect the educational usage we support and also helps us recover our production costs.

For more information about how to reserve your copy, please click here.

*Information taken from here.


  1. I saw this WONDERFUL documentary when I was on the faculty of the New England SCBWI conference. And, like you, I've been waiting (less than) patiently for it's release. Can't wait to buy a copy and share it with the critique group I run. Wahoo!

  2. Lucky me: I got to watch it just last night, thanks to our Seattle SCBWI. I thought it intriguing -- loved hearing from people I adore like Lois Lowry, David Small's openness was heart-wrenching, and Jerry Pinkney's kindness radiated off the screen and into our hearts -- but I left wondering what it was really about. The director said he'd started off with one idea and ended up somewhere else. This is a daily occurrence for writers! I thought the film was a great example of what can happen when we hang on to the things that spring-boarded us into a story but no longer truly fit the story as it has evolved.